ENOCK FAMILY HISTORY
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Arthur Henry Enock (1839-1917).


Arthur pictured in the 1890s.



Date of birth: Thursday, 2nd May, 1839.
Birthplace: Pyle, Glamorgan, Wales.
Baptised: Friday, 11th November, 1892 (Kingswear, Devon, England).
Date of death: Monday, 29th January, 1917 (aged 77 years).
Place of death:
Stoke Newington, London, England.
Buried/cremated: Friends Burial Ground, Yoakley Road, Stoke Newington, London, England.

Signature:



Arthur with 7 of 8 children - 1890s. Left to right (back) Eric, Guy, Arthur, Dora, Jack (middle) Donald, Lavinia, Ethel (front) Christine [1]


Father: Robert Enock (1811-1855).

Mother:
Elizabeth Enock (nee Doeg) (1810-1867). View Doeg family history site here here.

Siblings:

Charles Robert Enock (1837-1900)



Amy Jane Dell (nee Enock) (1841-1885)



Robinson Enock (1843-1909)



Frederick Enock (1845-1916)



Emma Enock (1847-1868)

Edwin Enock (1849-1924)



Sophia Elizabeth Derrington (nee Enock) (1853-1933)



Wife: Lavinia Georgina Hollis (1841-1899).



Date of marriage: Tuesday, 12th July, 1864.
Place of marriage: St. Bartholomew (Edgbaston Old Church), Edgbaston, Birmingham, England.



Children:

Arthur Frederick Enock (1865-1866)

Donald Enock (1867-1927?)



Charles Reginald Enock (1868-1970)



Arthur Guy Enock (1870-1956)



Eric Cuthbert Enock (1872-1952)



Esther Ethelind Enock (1874-1947)



Dorothea Amy Enock (1877-1959)



John Kemp Enock (1878-1957)



Christine Lavinia Enock (1881-1957).



1839-c1843 - Slade Road, Erdington, Birmingham, England.

The 1841 census shows that the Enocks were living very near to Salford House on the Slade Road. The 1889 Warwickshire OS map shows that the only houses near Salford House were by Gravelly Hill (the Spaghetti Junction end). There are a few old houses still standing, but it is impossible to say if one of these housed the Enocks in 1841.


c1843-c1846 - 59, Stock Street, Cheetham, Manchester, England.

Robinson's birth certificate states that the family were living on Stock Street in the sub-district of Market Street. Fred's birth entry in the Manchester, England, Non-Conformist Births and Baptisms, 1758-1912, gives the number as 59.

Most of the houses on Stocks Street appear to have been demolished in the 1950's. The area is now an industrial estate.


1851-c1854 - Stratford Road, Sparkbrook, Birmingham, England.

According to the 1851 census, the Enock's were seven entries away from the Angel Inn Hotel. By tying this information in with the 1889 OS town plan of Birmingham, the Enock's would have lived next-door to Ladypool School. The house was demolished to make way for St. Agatha's Church around 1898. 


1861-1868 - Balsall Heath Road, Balsall Heath, Birmingham, England.

In the 1861 census, the enumerator lists all the dwellings on the northerly side of Balsall Heath Road between Mount Pleasant and Longbridge Road. The Enock entry is 28 entries from Longmore Road and 19 from Mount Pleasant. Using this information against the 1889 OS map of Warwickshire, the Enock's appear to be somewhere in the middle, possibly Denmark Place.

The area is now barely recognisable. Denmark Place was demolished sometime between 1938-1952 and was replaced by council flats in the 1970's.

1889 OS map of Warwickshire.

1868-1871 - 13 Balsall Heath Road (same road Arthur lived in before marriage, to the left of the river). 


1872-1875 - 62 Pershore Road, Moor Green, Birmingham (is this Park Place mentioned in 1884 OS?).


1875-1880 - Middleton Villas, Middleton Hall Road, King's Norton, Birmingham (somewhere along this road).


1880-1888 - 1 Park Place (Pershore Road?), Moor Green, Birmingham (no longer there).


1888 - 26 Exchange Buildings in Stephenson Place, Birmingham and Hill Crest in Lickey just outside Rubery, Birmingham (work buildings?).

1891-c1893 - Coombeside (now Pinewoods), Kingswear, Brixham, Devon, England (how did I locate this house? read here).

1893-? - Dimora, Higher Erith Road, Torquay, Devon, England.


1895 - Cockington, Devon, England.

1897-1899 - Kingston Lodge, Townstal, Dartmouth, Devon, England (demolished before 1936) (how did I locate this house? read here).

1901-1907 - Inglewood, Totnes Road, Newton Abbot, Devon, England (how did I locate this house? read here).

1908 - 39, Powderham Road, Newton Abbott, Devon, England (how did I locate this house? read here).

1910-1912 - 12 (Cromartie), College Road, Newton Abbott, Devon, England.

1911 census - Valley Croft, Kewferry Road, Northwood, London, England (living with son Charles and family).


1861 census - Clerk.
1871 census - Manager to Brazil Merchants.
1881 census - Manager to Brazil Merchants.
1891 census - Landscape Artist.
1901 census - Landscape Artist.
1911 census - Artist.

Arthur lived with Charles and family between 1911 and 1916. It seems that Charles was more welcoming to his father than his siblings, but their relationship in later years appears strained. Arthur was in regular contact (regular visits) with all of his sons, but not his daughters.

'The dad made a most enchanting discussion and unkind argument, and said that we "had persuaded him to come to an unsuitable place".'

'It is a grief to me that at his age he is so tactless. He has so many splendid qualities otherwise.' 

'I am greatly sorry for this disagreement, but it was better to speak out about it to him than always to be feeling annoyance at his ways, and, also, I want him to do himself greater justice in this or any neighbourhood.'

'The dear old dad is quite feeble. He comes in frequently to see us and had tea with us yesterday. It is sad for us that at the close of his life he has so comparatively few resources. If he were well off he would have plenty of friends! Well we are doing what we can to entertain him.' 

'Dear old dad with his peculiar temperament. Great sadness comes over me at times about him. In his old age, practically alone, dependent upon others, in a strange home. He ought to have been well off and independent, with his own establishment. Still he seems not unhappy, for which I am thankful.' 

In the two weeks leading up to his father's death, Charles visited him every day.

'Have been all day helping to arrange for the dear dad removal to a nursing home. Stayed with him from 4 to 7:30; read some favourite passages from his bible to him (103 psalm etc) and wiped away the tears he shed. But he loved to hear it.'

'To think that an intelligent mind may, by the ills of the body, become debased is unspeakably painful to me, more so than the thought of any (?) ills.......I got the dads things here - the few poor "sticks" which were all of his personal property (his beautiful sketches of course).....I have been with him every day since his attack.'

'He was a good man, one of the most kind-hearted of men.' 

'It may seem unkind to say so, but my brothers do not seem to display much feeling about their dead father.'

Information and excerpts taken from Charles' diaries (held by the Imperial War Museum).

On Sunday, 7th January, 1917, Arthur suffered a 'paralytic stroke' (like his brother, Charles).

'On Sunday 7th, Guy came here and informed me that the dad had had another stroke of paralyses. I went up at 9:30pm, and found him wondering in mind and unable to sit up in bed. Dead old dad, it breaks my heart to see him so. I sat up all night, in the dining room of his place, going up every half hour to see him. Went again yesterday. He is rather better and more collected in mind, but quite incapacitated. Eric wired me this morning that he is a little better, but rather depressed. Must go up tomorrow (Concha in bed all day unwell). I think the dear old father will recover all his faculties again. Shall go up tomorrow.'

'Have been all day helping to arrange for the dear dad removal to a nursing home. Stayed with him from 4 to 7:30; read some favourite passages from his bible to him (103 psalm etc) and wiped away the tears he shed. But he lives to hear it. He is scarcely able to move, all hand is paralysed, his sight is very bad, and at times his mind wanders. Whether he will recover it is impossible to say.'

'Last night was a terrible night: the worst I have felt since my mother died, that is when I had the news of her death. I saw the doctor and got his report upon the dad. It was a (?) one. He thinks he will never recover, but the worst to me is that his mind (?) to the doctors - will never regain its powers. He says that a man in that condition may do anything, mad things, indecent things, that the good become wicked and vice versa often under such condition.......dear old dad, it breaks my heart. There is a heavy load on my head......To think that an intelligent mind may, by the ills of the body, become debased is unspeakably painful to me, more so than the thought of any (?) ills.......I got the dad's things here - the few poor "sticks" which were all of his personal property (his beautiful sketches of course).....I have been with him every day since his attack.'

'Enid and I went out to see the dear dad. He seemed exceedingly low and weak, but his mind was quite mad and he talked with understandably and asked me to read or say his favourite psalms, which I did (no one had been to him yesterday or today!) of the boys, Guy is still laid up with his serious hurt hip. Stayed from 3:15 to nearly 6. Should have stayed all night, as he asked me if I thought he was going to die? I resolved to stay but the nurse said his weakness was the (?) of the medicine, and that he was in no immediate danger.'

'I am by the dear old dad's bedside, where his life is ebbing fast away. It is doubtful that he can last throughout the day. Yet he appears to have no pain I am thankful to say. I think the last words he understood were on Friday, when I said again to him the first line of his favourite Psalm "bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits. His mercy is everlasting to everlasting". I cannot write. I would not keep him here. He is going to a better world. He deserves it. He was a good man, a noble and loyal heart, one of the most kind-hearted men that ever lived. When anyone was ill he could not do enough for them. His strong faith in his religion and his God never left him. His beautiful work has delighted and will delight many. His beautiful sketches and drawings.'

'1-15 the dear dad has passed away - very peacefully, 1-15 by his dear old gold watch. I was alone by his bedside when he stopped breathing and passed away and knelt and prayed.'

Information and excerpts taken from Charles' diaries (held by the Imperial War Museum).

Funeral.

'Yesterday, Concha and I went to the dad's funeral. We buried him in the friends burial ground at Stoke Newington. My feeling, and Concha's, was to have laid him to rest in old Wolborough in the dear mothers grave, in view of the Devon hills he loved so much. But it seemed difficult. Had I been in a position financially, I should have endeavoured to do it. However, there he rests in peace, though I deeply wish it were at Wolborough. I read a portion of the Church of England burial service at the meeting, those beautiful words, and paid tribute to his memory before the "Friends" as well as I was able. I said "he was not what you would call a "successful" man commercially, but he had throughout his life had done much beautiful work which had and would delight many. His faith was always a strong one: his Christian faith, and he ever looked forward to rest with his Heavenly Father, regarding this life as but leading to a life to come. I said also that he and I and some other of his children belonged to the Church of England and that "I hold it a privilege that he should rest in your quiet and peaceful burial ground. I thank you all from the bottom of my heart for your attendance here and your kind words. We were much attached to each other. But we know he is in a happier world." The Friends present liked these words and recognition of their kindness and the "elder" told me so afterwards. I read the service from his own dear old prayer book. Concha and the dear girlies have been very sad. It was difficult for me to read and speak at the meeting from emotion, but I was glad to have been able to do it. God rest him. He was a good man, one of the most kind-hearted of men. I cannot write anymore except to say that I read his will to the brothers after the funeral (at Guy's), and that today I went to Somerset House (with Enid) to see about the probate. The girls were not able to come up to the funeral, there is a God deal behind it though. On 31st I cabled Donald "prepare serious news dad reply". I did not like him to go on writing to a dear dad who had already gone. (I cannot forget that Guy was away "on business" when the dad died. How could he go out of town when he knew the end was at hand?)'

Information and excerpts taken from Charles' diaries (held by the Imperial War Museum).

Arthur was a self-taught artist. During his holidays, he sketched at Bettws-Y-Coed and around Snowdon.

In the early 1890's Arthur moved down to Devon to become a professional artist. He became known as the 'Artist of the Dart' and was noted for his handling of mist and sunlight. 

He exhibited a total of 74 works (between 1869-1910) including:

  • 13 at the Royal Institute of Watercolour Painter

  • 2 at the Royal Scottish Academy

  • 1 at the Royal Hibernian Academy

  • 25 at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists.

Arthur's works have been auctioned at auction houses such as Bonhams.