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Joseph Enock (1739-1785).

Date of birth: Tuesday, 5th June, 1739.[1]
Birthplace: Radway, Warwickshire, England.[1]
Date of death: Sunday 7th August 1785 (aged 46 years).[2]
Place of death:
Warwick, Warwickshire, England[2]
Place of burial:
Friends burial ground, High Street, Warwick.[2]


Signature:
[3]

Father: John Enock (1702-1790).[1+3]
Mother:
Alice Enock (nee ?) (1703-1776).[1+3]
Siblings: Mary Palmer (nee Enock) (1730-1807), Hannah Summerfield (nee Enock) (1732-1826), John Enock (1734-?), Esther Reynolds (nee Enock) (1736-1803), William Enock (1742-1827), Ann Enock (1747-), Martha Mealing (nee Enock) (1749-1793).

Wife: Betty Enock (nee Woodman) (1735-1806).[3]
Date of marriage: Tuesday, 5th May, 1767.[3]
Place of marriage: Quaker Meeting House, Bristol, England.[3]

Children: Mary Enock (1770-?), Arthur Peters Enock (1772-1808), Joseph Enock (1774-1862), Robert Enock (1777-1817).[4]

Residences.

1739 - Radway, Warwickshire, England.[1]
1767 Quaker marriage entry -
Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
[3]
1774 Joseph Enock birth entry - Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
[4]
1777 Robert Enock birth entry - Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
[4]
1785 Quaker death entry - Alveston, Warwickshire, England.
[2]

Occupation.

1767 Quaker marriage entry - Flax Dresser.[3]
1777 Robert Enock birth entry - Mealman.
[4]
1785 Quaker death entry - Mealman.
[2]

Mealman.

A mealman is a dealer of the grain, meal.

I would wish the people to understand that there is not a trader more beneficial to the public than the mealman, so long as his business is conducted fairly, regularly, and under just profits. He is become absolutely necessary to the permanent and equal supply of great towns; he must therefore be encouraged, not distressed or oppressed. It must not, however, but be remarked on the other hand, how absolutely the more necessary it becomes to take heed that he does not establish a monopoly, or become an extortioner."[5]

"I must here repeat what I said above, that the intervention of the factor as mealman is necessary in all great towns. Without such interposition the people could not be supplied at all times without-great inconvenience and loss; they would be very irregularly and very ill supplied, and often risk a temporary dearth. If the mealman has no more than his fair commission, producing a sufficient interest for his capital, it is money well bestowed by the community, and well earned by him."[5] 

The mealman was the middleman between the miller, and the baker, making his money by commission. See below for an insight in to a mealman's wage.

Alveston Mills.

'Lease for 21 years from Newsham Peers late of Alveston, but now of Southampton, Hants., esq., to Joseph Enock and Thomas Whitehead, of Warwick, mealmen, of the watercorn mills called Alveston Mills, with the dressing mills, and five floodgates for catching fish and other purposes, land called the Dennys and Mill Lane and all appurtenances (with certain exceptions), 25th November 1778.''[6]

Alveston mills pictured in the early 1900s. Mill Lane lies behind the mill[7]

Maps showing the location of Alveston mills (the black block below the word mill, and above 19). The mills had fell in to ruins as early as the 1880s (click to enlarge). [8]

The area as it looked on the 28th March, 2016. The mill would have stood roughly by the tree on the right hand side. (click to enlarge).[9]

Personal Finances.

It appears that Joseph and family were comfortable in terms of finances: not poor, not of affluence. 

The average wage per annum in the 1700s was between 17 (agricultural labourers) and 22 (miners)[10]. 15 to 20 per year was considered a low wage, and a figure closer to 40 was needed to keep a family.[11] 

This article below shows that it was possible for a mealman to earn between 33 and 66 per annum. This seems a feasible estimate, especially when taking in to account that between 1781 and 1784, Joseph sent his children, Arthur and Joseph, to board at Ackworth School at a total cost of 16. 16s. per annum.[12] 

'State of Profits on the manufacturing of Bread-Corn as collected from Experiments made by Mr. T. Pownall', which featured in the January 1773 issue of 'The Gentleman's and London Magazine' (click to enlarge).[13] 

Life in Radway.

An enclosure map of Radway, created by George Salmon in 1756, shows a section of land under ownership of a family called 'Ennock'. This is the sole mention of the name on the map, so this could very well be where John was living at the time.

The enclosure map of Radway, created by George Salmon in 1756.[14]

Left: the enclosure map of Radway from 1756[14]
Right: Radway pictured in 2014.[15]

'Ennock Cottage' pictured from Langdon Lane in 2013. The entrance to 'Hemp Close' is in the middle of the picture, to the left of the cottage.[9]

'Ennock Cottage' pictured from Langdon Lane in 2013. The entrance to 'Hemp Close' would've been to the far left.[9]

The Enocks were devout Quakers, and one member of the family, a William Enock, helped to fund the building of a meeting house within the village in 1702[16]. Meetings were held here until 1850, and since 1985, has been known as "Oriel Cottage". According to the Listed British Buildings website, the cottage has a burial ground to the rear.[17]

It is pretty certain that that many Enocks had their births, marriages and deaths registered here, and many graves in the back garden!

'Oriel Cottage' pictured from The Green in 2013.[9]

Do you have any more information on Joseph? Please contact me at adam.c.enock@gmail.com.

Page updated 30th March, 2016.

Notes.

1. England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837.
-Monthly Meeting of Warwickshire South (Shipston [on Stour], Campden) Radway.
-Piece 0948: Monthly Meeting of Warwickshire South (Shipston [on Stour], Campden) Radway (1660-1827).

2. England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837.
-
Quarterly Meeting of Warwickshire, Leicestershire and Rutland.
-Piece 0947: Quarterly Meeting of Warwickshire, Leicestershire and Rutland: Burial notes (1700-1794).

3. England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837.
-
Monthly Meeting of Bristol.
-Piece 0128: Monthly Meeting of Bristol: Marriages (1703-1776).

4. Mary, Arthur and Joseph:

England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837.
-
Monthly of Warwickshire Middle, later united to Warwickshire North.
-Piece 1435: Monthly of Warwickshire Middle, later united to Warwickshire North (1623-1833).

Robert:

England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837.
-
Monthly of Warwickshire Middle, later united to Warwickshire North.
-Piece 0734: Warwickshire Middle, later united to Warwickshire North: Births (1776-1809).

5. Letter on the subject of bread - 1814 by John Dumbell.

6. Warwickshire Archives - 02951 - PEERS FAMILY OF ALVESTON HALL - Doc ref no: CR2474/2 - Title: Lease for 21 years from Newsham Peers late of Alveston, but now of Southampton, Hants., esq., to Joseph Enock and Thomas Whitehead, of Warwick, mealmen.

7. Taken from www.windowsonwarwickshire.org.uk.

8. Left hand map taken from: OS Six-inch England and Wales, 1842-1952 - 1886 Warwickshire XLIV.NE (includes: Alveston; Charlecote; Hampton Lucy; Old Stratford Within.) Available to view here: http://maps.nls.uk/view/101585662

Right hand map taken from Google Maps.

9. Photo by Adam Enock.

10. Information found here http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/wages.htm

11. Information found here https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/static/Coinage.jsp 

12. Ackworth School costs taken from 'Ackworth School' by Elfrida Vipoint.

13. Found via Google Books.

14. Enclosure map taken from 'A History of Radway' by William Brook. The map is held by the Warwickshire County Records Office.

15. Taken from Google Maps.

16. Reference number CR2394, held by the Warwickshire County Records Office. Can be found online here.

17.
Information taken from here: http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-306206-oriel-cottage-radway-warwickshire#.VvwEkdIrKt8